Brazing Safety Tips: Six Steps for Safe Brazing

Posted by Lucas-Milhaupt Brazing Experts on Jan 22, 2019

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While safety is a critical component in any manufacturing operating, brazing carries its own hazards, including chemical fumes and the heat and rays of the torch flame.

Modern safety programs focus on behavior-based safety (BBS) – encouraging employees to focus on actions leading to safer outcomes by preventing an injury or accident – rather than using only conformance-based approaches designed to penalize non-compliance or eliminate all risk.

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Topics: Brazing Fundamentals, Brazing Tips

Benefits of Controlled Atmosphere Brazing in Automotive Manufacturing

Posted by Lucas-Milhaupt Brazing Experts on Oct 31, 2018

If you have taken a look under the hood of your car lately, you likely have seen parts that were brazed using a Controlled Atmosphere Brazing (CAB) process. As more and more automotive manufacturers switch to aluminum components to increase performance and decrease car weight, the demand for strong, leak tight joints increases. These types of joints can be found throughout a typical vehicle from the radiator to the A/C condenser.

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Topics: Brazing Fundamentals, Automotive

How To Clean Brazing Metals

Posted by Lucas-Milhaupt Brazing Experts on Sep 26, 2018

Capillary action will work properly only when the surfaces of the metals are clean. If they are contaminated, IE: coated with oil, grease, rust, scale or just plain dirt, those contaminants have to be removed. If they remain, they will form a barrier between the base metal surfaces and the brazing materials.

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Topics: Brazing Fundamentals

Proper Assembly For Brazing

Posted by Lucas-Milhaupt Brazing Experts on Aug 15, 2018

Once the parts of the assembly for your brazed joint are cleaned and fluxed, it is time to put the assembly together. If the shape and weight of the parts permit, the simplest way to hold them together is by gravity. Hold each part in position for brazing, steadying the parts in correct alignment during the heating and cooling cycles, so that capillary action can do its job. 

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Topics: Brazing Fundamentals

How to Clean a Braze Joint in Two Steps

Posted by Lucas-Milhaupt Brazing Experts on Jun 14, 2018

Once you have properly brazed the assembly, you will need to clean the brazed joint. Cleaning a braze joint is a two step process. The first step is to remove all flux residues. Second, pickle the joint to remove any oxide scale formed during the brazing process.

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Topics: Brazing Fundamentals, Flux

How to Flux Brazing Joints

Posted by Lucas-Milhaupt Brazing Experts on Mar 30, 2018

Flux is a chemical compound applied to the joint surfaces before brazing. Flux is essential in the brazing process because it prevents oxides from forming and inhibiting the metallurgical bond in brazing. Oxides are the result of chemical combination between the hot metal and oxygen in the air and form when a metal surface is heated. These oxides must be prevented from forming or they'll inhibit the brazing filler metal from wetting and bonding to the surfaces.

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Topics: Brazing Fundamentals

Brazing Assembly: How to Braze a Joint

Posted by Lucas-Milhaupt Brazing Experts on Jan 18, 2018

The fifth step of proper brazing procedure is where the action happens: this is how to actually braze a joint. Brazing involves heating the assembly to brazing temperature, and flowing the filler metal through the joint. First, the heating process. As we've seen in brazing, you apply heat broadly to the base metals. If you're brazing a small assembly, you may heat the entire assembly to the flow point of the brazing filler metal. If you're brazing a large assembly, you heat a broad area around the joint. The heating method most commonly used in brazing a single assembly is the hand held torch.

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Topics: Brazing Fundamentals

How to Maintain Clearance for Brazed Joints

Posted by Lucas-Milhaupt Brazing Experts on Oct 30, 2017

Brazing, as we've seen, uses the principle of capillary action to distribute the molten filler metal between the surfaces of the base metals. Therefore, during the brazing operation, you should take care to maintain a clearance between the base metals to allow capillary action to work most effectively. This means, in almost all cases, a close clearance.

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Topics: Brazing Fundamentals

Flux Removal: Post-Braze Cleaning

Posted by Lucas-Milhaupt Brazing Experts on May 16, 2016

 

Depending on your brazing process, you may need to perform post-braze joint cleaning to remove residual flux. This step can be crucial since most fluxes are corrosive. Post-braze cleaning is one of the Six Fundamentals of Brazing*.

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Topics: Flux, Brazing Fundamentals

Liquidus vs. Solidus

Posted by Lucas-Milhaupt Brazing Experts on Mar 26, 2014

Liquidus vs. Solidus
Simply put, liquidus is the lowest temperature at which an alloy is completely liquid; solidus is the highest temperature at which an alloy is completely solid.

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Topics: Brazing Fundamentals